I Heart Ciplak

*Ciplak = counterfeit

 

Ciplak, chaplang, cetak-rompak,

Labels invented to create separation,

Between what is ‘real’ and what is not,

Yet, it is the million dollar war-cry by wealthy corporations,

 

Telling us what we can and cannot buy,

I say, ‘Fuck the corporations’

I will choose what I want to buy or not to buy,

Let’s make it legal, remove the ‘ill’ and legal will be well,

 

I heart Ciplak

And if you have a problem with the Chinese sounding ‘Ciplak’,

Let’s give it a nice French name like ‘Homage’

Since imitation is the highest form of flattery,

You will be doing society the greatest service,

 

Help reduce the disparity between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have nots’

Let’s help everyone become equal,

We could live life imitating Big Momma R,

Since she did almost win the ‘Lead By Example’ award,

 

I can afford to buy a ‘BERKINS’ even-though it’s spelled ‘BERKINI’,

Not from Hermes of France but from a roadside shop at Serikin,

I can smell like ‘CHANEL’ though my bottle is spelled with two ‘N’s,

Smelling rosy even if I develop a nasty rash,

 

And if imitation is my thing,

Malaysia celebrates homage like no other,

From Petaling Street to the MO1 famous halls of Putrajaya,

From the Eye of Malaysia that developed conjunctivitis,

To ideas of a Malaysian New York Central Park,

That took a 650 million ringgit donation from the Malaysian tax payers,

 

Heck, we even have Petaling Street, the world’s centre of Homage.

A huge contributor to Malaysian economy,

And boy do we need to increase the nation’s coffers,

Trying to fake an Arab donation, didn’t really work out well,

 

 

We are a nation that survives on homage,

Never fully achieving maximum homage,

And even lesser than a full out ‘Ciplak’,

We talk big but never copy well,

 

Our so called Democratic-parliament is a poor copy of North Korea’s People Democratic Republic,

And forget paying homage to intelligence,

Our cabinet ministers are so smart,

Donald Trump would pay us to keep them,

 

We say look to the east, imitate the Japanese,

But we went as far as copying their porn industry then industry itself,

We laughed at China for their crazy ‘ciplak’-ing skills,

Yet flaunt our ‘Made in China’ iPhones,

 

I wear a 500 ringgit Seiko 5 Pepsi watch, Made in Malaysia,

Poor man’s Rolex they say, an attempt to imitate a great watch,

But if we were both late to a meeting,

Mine will be a cheaper mistake than your 30,000 ringgit Rolex GMT Pepsi, Made in Switzerland,

 

I heart ciplak,

Like how you watch ‘Train to Busan’ on DVD,

The week it was released at the cinema,

So we’re both cheap and looking to cut corners,

“Jimat cermat dengan perbelanjaan rumah,” kan PM dah advice,

 

Embrace ciplak, and you remove all status standings,

Because is not that what it is all about?

You hold status by the original item you purchase,

A rub in the face, that you have more money than me,

 

All because you can afford it, thus you’re higher, greater and better than me?

I heart ciplak because even copies have a place in this world.

 

THE END

 

The journey continues…

My journey as a writer has taken many turns over the years. I have stop writing for news-portals and have over the past two years focused my attention to the formation and activities of a writer’s group, based here in Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia.

It is a joy to see a small collective of liked minded people, come together, and find ways to expand the art of writing and spoken word.

Yes, to read one’s work before an audience is a daunting task, but in my opinion, is the zenith for any writer. You write for others to read and to hear your work.

By standing on a platform, people can hear your work, spoken as it was written in your mind. Your voice is now heard, not just behind the nuances of words but actually heard.

So, if you have the time check out the group I am working with at our Facebook page -> Wordsmiths Of Kuching.

Cheers!

Scriptwriting on my mind

When I was in college and university, I was active in the theatre groups and did time on stage myself, but what has always appealed to me was script-writing. This is evident in my everyday writing as I tend to have strong dialogues in my stories.

But I have always been hesitant in making the leap from writing articles and stories to scripts. A leap to some but to me, its like the cow jumping over the moon.

Yet, it has been on my mind lately. So the question I posing here is, how do one make the leap into script-writing in general and also for the Malaysian market?

Post your answers in the comments.

I’ve moved my blog…

No, it’s not because the Malaysian authorities came knocking at my door and asked me to simmer down (though some friends are concern for me *thanks*) but I finally got round to getting my own domain name.

Folks, I’ve successfully moved my blog to my own name. You can find all the goodness over at www.macleanpatrick.com, so please update your bookmarks and links and I appreciate having you drop into the new place. This site will still be up, allowing access to all my articles but everything else will be at www.macleanpatrick.com. So see you all there!

A (web)site of my own.

I’ve been putting it off for ages and today I finally came round to doing it. I purchased my own domain name – http://www.macleanpatrick.com. I’m a webmaster by profession and I manage close to 67 micro-sites for the local university and I never came round to purchasing my own domain name.

I’m pleasantly surprised my name is even available. Though I’m also happy that www.maclean.com is also a tech-guy himself.

I’ve purchased a hosting plan and will be porting over the contents from this website over to the new site. I’ll be setting up some form of monetary plan to help pay for the site but it won’t involve any purchases on your part. It’ll probably be some ads on the bottom or right-hand menu columns.

I will keep you guys posted on the progress and when to start updating the bookmarks. I don’t think WordPress allows redirections.

Cheers!

A day without my iPhone.

I left my iPhone at home and I’m not missing it. Instead, I welcome this sense of not being connected to the world for a day. I’m not jittery about the thought of missing calls or text  messages. A day of not hearing from me would not kill any-body. In fact, I know all the people who would contact me and most would do that after work, when I am at home flipping through the television channels.

I blogged about the day when I did not have email for half a day at work and I did not miss it. Now, I want to go 8 hours without my iPhone and (frankly speaking) I am really not missing it.

So if  you ever feel the need to have some time off for yourself, just leave your hand-phone at home and go about your life. A moment of dis-connection would do you wonders. It lets us focus on ourselves for a few hours, giving us that space we need to breathe and know that in life; not texting or calling people, would do us no harm.

Change is coming to Malaysia

I normally don’t want to talk about politics on this blog and reserve it for my articles at FreeMalaysiaToday.net, but I can’t help in commenting about the Sibu by-election and the slim win by the opposition party, DAP.

I got a text message at 9.30pm, yesterday evening, that DAP was leading. I had known since 1.30pm that they were in the lead after the rural votes were tallied. With my friend’s text at 9.30pm, I knew then that a half miracle had happened. The opposition DAP had won in a city which, for all it seems, was going in favor to the ruling government – Barisan Nasional (National Front).

And as expected, not much is commented about this win in the main-stream media. A small mentioned in The Star Online and a whisper in The New Straits Times. After a week of lop-sided coverage, news of the results going against the establishment is relegated to obituary status. This is the mind-set of news-reporting in Malaysia. News reports should always polish up the standings of the current government.

I’m in a way, happy for the results of the Sibu by-election. It shows that the Malaysian public is waking up and deciding for themselves who they want in parliament.